Best places to find SALA art where you’ll least expect it

Cemeteries, airports and distilleries aren’t places usually brimming with art, but works forming this year’s 2018 South Australia Living Artists (SALA) Festival will be hard to miss.

The annual festival kicks off on August 1 and runs until August 31, with a ground-breaking 9000 artists taking part in more than 700 exhibitions and events across metropolitan Adelaide and regional South Australia.

Aside from the usual galleries, museums, libraries and cafés, some unsuspecting locations will also show paintings, sculptures and creations.

“Art doesn’t have to hang on gallery walls or be hard to access,” says SALA festival director Penny Griggs.

“This year’s program reflects the diversity and inclusivity of the SALA Festival.

“We are thrilled that 9000 people will showcase their unique concept of living art to the people of SA.”

Here’s five places to find SALA art where you’ll least expect it!

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1. Distilleries

Sip a G&T and enjoy contemporary abstract works exploring “the passionate collision of emotions and colour” at Prohibition Liquor Co in the Adelaide’s CBD.

Artist Katie Spry’s works will be on show at this Gilbert Street craft spirits producer, which recently took a sweep of awards both here and overseas. 

Catch Katie’s exhibition Colour Ascension from August 2-30.

Regional SA isn’t immune to SALA festivities, nor has escaped spirit fever.

Most of the state’s best spirit producers are based in regional areas, including in Renmark, where Twenty Third Street Distillery can be found.

The Riverland distillery will host There is no place like home featuring works by five artists exploring what home means no matter how little or much you have.

For those wandering through the Barossa, the Barossa Distilling Company in Nuriootpa is showing Botanical by Lottie Rosenzweig.

Spot her quirky embroidered Italian line wall hangings and illustrations.

Drove to the airport to get my art on 🖼 #salacitizen #universalcitizen #sala

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2. Adelaide Airport

Photos, paintings and computer generated imagery will take over the Adelaide Airport this SALA Festival for Universal Citizen. 

The installations created by eight talented SA artists will be on display until September 23.

SA institutions the SAHMRI building and the Adelaide Central Market will also make an appearance.

Artists include Aida Azin, Liam Bosecke, Tracy Lymn, Kaspar Schmidt Mumm, Brianna Speight, Harry Thing, Dan Withey, and Emmaline Zanelli.

Adelaide Airport processes more than eight million passengers a year, so it’s fair to say that thousands of people will view these works!

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3. Cemeteries

There’s probably no better place to contemplate life and art than in a cemetery.

Adelaide’s largest cemetery, Centennial Park, has a sculptural SALA walk featuring works by 13 artists.

The pieces are scattered throughout the park and tranquil gardens, and visitors can also explore the cemetery’s permanent art installations.

In another SALA event, community artist Koruna Schmidt Mumm has been working with the Friends of Walkerville Wesleyan Cemetery and St Andrew’s Primary School on activating the historic Wesleyan Cemetery.

From August 9–17, visitors can explore the ideas of what lies below, who the buried citizens are, and how cemeteries are viewed by modern society.

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4. Tattoo parlour

Black Diamond Tattoo studio in Port Adelaide isn’t just about inking up – it’ll also host a series of Aboriginal artworks by Anangu woman Elizabeth Close for SALA 2018.

Using a fusion of contemporary and traditional Aboriginal art styles, Elizabeth has collated new works and old favourites for her solo exhibition Red Dust Rough Diamond.

Prints will be for sale at the launch on August 10, with mulled wine and cider on offer.

A live smoking ceremony will unfold, as will live tattooing featuring designs by Elizabeth.

You can also spot Elizabeth’s street art on Adelaide’s inner city walls.

Come escape this dreary weather with Mt Compass G3 Botanical Gin. Normally we serve this Gin with Passionfruit & Basil but since it’s our Gin of the Week, we’re mixing it up with some lively Pineapple & Mint.🍍🌿 Mt Compass have created this Navy Strength Gin by increasing the alcohol & tripling the botanicals of its base Gin. This consists of earthly notes of Angelica, Coriander & light Citrus flavours with indigenous Lemon Myrtle to deliver a Gin with plenty of strength, character and flavour. From 7-8pm we’ll also be serving $5 Pikes Pilsner or Lager or 2 for $20 Flower Bomb, Blackberry & Basil Bramble or Espresso Martini Cocktails. #thehowlingowlcafe #mcspirits #navystrength #ginisourthing #ginstagram #gin #ginlovers #ginoftheweek #happyhour #cocktails

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5. The pub

Adelaide-based artist Luke Thurgate will lead participants on an art pub crawl where participants can “draw under the influence”.

The 18+ Sketchy Art Tour is an interactive art event that will explore drawing in a number of bars and watering holes across Adelaide’s CBD.

The crew will depart the Grace Emily Hotel on Friday, August 24, at 7pm. It’s free!

Luke is also hosting a separate SALA event, Date Night Tour, departing the Howling Owl bar on August 17, at 7pm.

Get new sparks flying or rekindle the flame as you bar hop across the city while drawing and enjoying a tipple or two. Also free!

For those wanting a traditional art fix:

  • Head to the Lenzerheide Restaurant in Adelaide’s southern suburbs to spot painting and photography exhibition, Apokalypsis. Featuring works by Corey Gray and Peter Hall, the exhibition aims to reveal the “public, private and secret immersions of our everyday lives”. Corey will also unveil his commissioned work of Australian comedy legend, Dave Flanagan. The launch is on August 3, but the exhibition continues until the end of the month.
  • The West Gallery Thebarton gathered 13 of the state’s most innovative contemporary artists and asked them what drives them to paint. The result is APPROACHES |13 SA Contemporary Painters on display at the gallery until September 2. There will be an artist talk on Saturday, August 18, 2pm.

For the full SALA program and further details head here.

Header image: SALA Still Life Tour Clare Valley, 2017, photo by Sam Roberts.
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First female director appointed to Art Gallery of SA

The Art Gallery of South Australia has appointed its first female director in its 137-year history.

Brisbane-born Rhana Devenport will step into the role in October, after moving on from her place as director of the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki in New Zealand.

She is replacing Nick Mitzevich who is now leading the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra.

Rhana, who was this year appointed an officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit for her services to the arts, is the first woman to take on the director’s role in the art gallery’s history.

The announcement comes just days before the Art Gallery of SA’s exclusive exhibition Colours of Impressionism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay wraps up on Sunday, July 29.

The paintings are from the renowned collection of the Musée d’Orsay in Paris and chart the revolution of Impressionism, a 19th Century art movement known for its vibrant techniques and colour.

Claude Monet, Water lily pond, pink harmony, 1900, oil on canvas, 90 x 100 cm; Musée d’Orsay, Paris, France. © Musée d’Orsay, dist. RMN-Grand Palais / Patrice Schmidt.

The Art Gallery of SA says the impressionist exhibition, featuring masterpieces by famous artists Monet, Cézanne, Renoir and Pissarro, among others, is on track to break the gallery’s record for ticketed attendances.

The previous record is 124,000 attendances, set by The Chinese Exhibition in 1977.

The Art Gallery of SA attracts more than 800,000 people per year.

Rhana brings with her 25 years’ experience in collection development and exhibition presentation across a number of national and international platforms, with her career allowing her to forge significant connections with artists, donors, benefactors and sponsors.

“I am deeply honored by this appointment, the Art Gallery of SA has forged an excellent reputation for its ambition, its outstanding collection, and a dynamic exhibitions program,” she says.

“I am thrilled to be leading this strong and innovative cultural organisation into the future.

“Great art museums are the heart of great cities and reflect how a city considers itself in the world and how it contributes to self-discovery, empathy and shared knowledge.”

The Art Gallery of South Australia’s new director Rhana Devenport.

Art Gallery of SA chair Tracey Whiting describes Rhana as an international arts leader.

Rhana’s arts history includes being the director of the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery in New Zealand and leading the development of the Len Lye Centre.

SA Premier Steven Marshall says Rhana brings a wealth of experience, leadership acumen and a genuine commitment and understanding of the role art plays in people’s lives.

“SA has a proud history of championing the role and contribution of women across all sectors of our community – from politics and Indigenous affairs, to science and the arts – and this appointment continues that legacy,” he says.

Rhana will relocate to Adelaide with her husband, multimedia artist Tim Gruchy.

Visit I Choose SA to meet the people building business and industry in SA, and to find out how your choices make a difference to our state.

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Oldest regional art gallery at the heart of community

Regional communities are run on the dedication of passionate people and hard working volunteers.

A sentiment no different in the South East town of Naracoorte, where in 2018 the local Naracoorte Art Gallery will be celebrating its 50th birthday, along with many of those passionate and hard working people.

This milestone will make the Naracoorte Art Gallery the longest running regional gallery in South Australia.

Having always been run by a board of 10 members, the gallery is currently chaired by local Kaye Beauchamp, two paid secretaries Rachel Haynes and Lesley Barker, and a team of “wonderful” volunteers.

The gallery’s recent exhibition Iconography has been a huge hit, with Harrow portraits artist Ron Penrose creating visual masterpieces of local icons and celebrities.

Fremantle footballer Lachie Neale, who grew up on the Limestone Coast, is part of the Iconography exhibition. PHOTO: Naracoorte Herald.

Currently running until May 13, the exhibition showcases portraits of ex-Naracoorte Football Club legend and SA export turned AFL’s Fremantle Football Club player Lachie Neale and Naracoorte Lucindale Mayor Erika Vickery, among others.

Secretary Rachel Haynes says the gallery wouldn’t stay open without the support of local volunteers.

“Without our volunteers the gallery could not open its doors, and we are very grateful to the support we receive and also to the board members,” she says.

“We are open Wednesday to Friday 10am to 4pm and Saturday and Sunday 10am to 3pm.

“The Naracoorte Lucindale Council also provides monetary support annually, without this we could not keep our doors open.”

Dozens of locals attend the exhibition opening. PHOTO: Naracoorte Herald.

Rachel says the gallery also has a huge benefit on the local community as it appeals to a wide range of people and is free to visit.

“In a world full of things made in China it is a treat to find something made with love by a local artist,” she says.

“There is always something new to see or try, and spark the imagination, provide an outlet for the artistically minded, a community where like minded people can come together to learn, or be inspired or just to behold.”

Over the years the local community has shown great support to the gallery’s exhibitions, workshops and retail shop.

Catering for all walks of life, ages and artistic ability, the gallery continues to enrich the lives of those involved on a daily basis and those who visit on occasion.

Iconography highlights this by telling the stories of people from all backgrounds.

Naracoorte Art Gallery secretaries Lesley Barker, left, and Rachel Haynes. PHOTO: Naracoorte Herald.

“Just like the sitters of our Iconography exhibition the portraits bring the community together to honour and recognise our locals,” Rachel says.

“Our children’s and adult art workshops are very popular and it is great to see the young ones engaged and excited to see their masterpiece hanging proudly on the wall.

“Our aim is to encourage appreciation of the arts, and the promotion of local artists.”

For those at the heart of the gallery, it is always important to showcase local artists and local personalities, to celebrate those people in the community who make a huge contribution.

Reaching milestones like the 50th anniversary can only be achieved when individuals give up their time to create something for others.

It’s those passionate people and hard working volunteers who push these history making milestones over the line.

Header image: Naracoorte Lucindale Mayor Erika Vickery alongside her portrait at the town’s art gallery. Photo courtesy of the Naracoorte Herald.

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